Hong Kong’s Next Typhoon Names: The Best & Weirdest Choices
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Here’s The Hong Kong Typhoon Names You Voted For That Actually Make Sense

In 2023, the Hong Kong Observatory organized the "Tropical Cyclone Name Collection Activity," inviting the local public to suggest names that embody the city's characteristics and expand the reserve list of tropical cyclone names.

The response was overwhelming, with over 20,000 votes flooding in, showcasing the community's engagement and awareness of tropical cyclone hazards.

These names will be incorporated into the reserve list of tropical cyclone names for Hong Kong, China, adding a touch of local identity to future storms. Winners who participated in the voting will be notified via email about their souvenir collection.

The new names reflect the city's unique blend of culture, nature, and resilience. As Hong Kong embraces these new additions to its tropical cyclone name reserve list, residents and visitors alike can appreciate the rich tapestry of Hong Kong's identity and its ability to weather the storms that come its way.

Here are our favourite picks from the top 20 list, and why we think they would be an excellent choice for the next tropical cyclone.

Milktea

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Hong Kong styled milk tea is best enjoyed at your favourite Cha Chaan Teng, recognized as an iconized city trademark and go-to order for locals and travellers alike.

Despite the popular sentiment that a Typhoon 8 means more time for a cozy morning lie-in, the fact is that it gets us out of bed earlier with a kick - just as a well-made Hong Kong milk tea would! The city-wide anticipation for the T8 signal alert to be announced has us waiting excitedly by our TV screens or refreshing the HKO webpage manically at 7:59 AM.

Sparrow

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The chirping songs of the sparrow makes up the much of the Hong Kong soundscape, especially from March to late-April; right before the peak typhoon season in July. Calling in the raging storms and waterlogged drains, we can always rely on nature alarm bells to notify us of the upcoming cyclones.

Dim-sum

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As an expansive library of Cantonese dishes enjoyed for brunch, dim-sum is a foolproof way to get all your loved ones together over a spread of bite sized dishes and warm cups of tea. Typhoon Dim-sum can do the much of same, blowing on the shutters and kicking up dust while your whole family stays home, catching up on some long-awaited conversations and sharing a slow meal in the peace and quiet of their homes.

Siu-lung

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‘Siu-lung’, meaning Little Dragon in Cantonese, honours the late martial artist and pop-culture icon: Bruce Lee. Credited with promoting Hong Kong cinema and changing the way American cinema presented Asian people, Typhoon Siu Long could very well bring new changes to the terrain with as much ferocity as Bruce has done in the film industry. Uprooting trees and causing crashing waves ashore, we’re not all too sure that this might be the best way to remember his legacy, but the sentiment is there.

Sampan

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Small wooden boats with flat bottoms were historically used for transportation and fishing, drawing attention to Hong Kong’s rich sea-faring history. Come typhoon season, sampans would be used to shuttle passengers to the closest Typhoon shelters. What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger, after all, making Sampan an apt moniker in remembering how Hong Kong has endured the cyclones as early as the Tang dynasty.

Pui-pui

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Pui-pui the saltwater crocodile aroused public interest when she was first spotted at Shan Pui River in 2003. As one of Hong Kong’s rare crocodile sightings, Pui-pui’s notoriety across Hong Kong is well preserved through picture books and plushies; what’s a typhoon more? She’ll surely be bathing in the cyclone showers from her permanent home of the Hong Kong Wetland Park.

Treefrog

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The Romer’s Tree Frog can be found around streams, water canals, and ponds – often hiding between leaves and in bushes. Breeding season for these little guys span as far out from March to September – swallowing up the typhoon peak seasons in the latter half of its mating period. The next time a Typhoon happens across the city, we hope you’re thinking of the treefrogs seeking companionship despite the hellish storms.

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