D’Ouro at Roosevelt Macau Restaurant Review | Delish Eats
REVIEWS

Delish Eats: D’Ouro, Taste of Contemporary Portuguese at Roosevelt Macau

Restaurant story: D'Ouro, one of the four primary restaurants at the Macau Roosevelt hotel, stands as the singular ambassador of Portuguese cuisine at this location. The restaurant made its debut in 2017, in sync with the grand opening of the luxury hotel.

Chef story: D’Ouro is led by Chef Herlander Fernandes, a native of Portugal. Driven by his passion for presenting authentic Portuguese flavours, Fernandes creatively reinterprets traditional dishes and infuses respected ingredients with contemporary charm.

What’s the vibe and venue like: The dining area, broad and open, is accentuated with elements drawn from the Iberian aesthetic. This inviting space can host gatherings of varying scales, ranging from large groups to intimate pairings, with its sidelines and corners offering more private spots. There is also a terrace area that overlooks the riverside, a great spot for drinks and nibbles during sunset hours.

The Macau Roosevelt Hotel

How much does it cost: Our table of two had footed a bill totalling MOP1510, which amounts to MOP755 per person.

What is the menu about: Curated by Chef Herlander from the à la carte menu, the dishes present a comprehensive panorama of Portuguese cuisine's finest offerings. By artfully reinterpreting traditional dishes with a modern cooking style and presentation, the meal serves as an introductory journey through the nation's key ingredients in a way that is both approachable and innovative. Additionally, the restaurant's menu also boasts a wide variety of smoked meats, an extensive selection of fish and seafood, and an array of wines waiting to be explored.

What did we order: Tiborna de alheira (MOP118), Caldo Verde (MOP 58), Bacalhau à Brás (MOP248), Polvo à Lagareiro (MOP373), Leitão Assado (MOP 378), Brisa do Liz (MOP48)

Not pictured: Presunto Pata Negra 36 meses (MOP287), Sopa de Peixe (MOP88)

Tiborna de alheira

Tiborna de alheira: The Tiborna was beautifully presented, appearing like an edible medallion of amber and emerald. The 'ovo' yolk blended seamlessly with the garlicky spinach, maintaining a firm texture to the bread, preventing it from becoming soggy. The palate was homely yet sophisticated, achieving a greater depth of flavor.

Caldo Verde

Caldo Verde: Before I came to taste it, the luscious aroma of the soup drew me in for a hearty slurp. The finely pureed potato doesn't overpower but rather provides a velvety richness that surpasses cream alone. The surface of the soup is adorned with specks of oil, enhancing both the aroma and flavour and pairing splendidly with the zest from the crisped chorizo.

Bacalhau à Brás

Bacalhau à Brás: A cherished ingredient in Portuguese cooking, Bacalhau is a dried and salted variant of the humble codfish, offering light, fluffy bites of savoury delight. The heaping portion of this dish enhances the cod's texture with a hint of tang from onion stew and olive, offering a sensational mouthful. However, we recommend pairing this item with a side dish or better managing the portions, as we were regrettably too full to take full advantage of its generous size.

Polvo à Lagareiro

Polvo à Lagareiro: I've always found octopus to be a reliable indicator of whether an establishment excels at preparing seafood. The roasted polvo (octopus) at D’ouro was perhaps one of the best octopus dishes I've tasted - firm on the tongue yet sliced with ease, with crisped edges. The romesco sauce heightened the smokiness of the meat perfectly, providing a tangy complement to the acidity of the tomato confit.

Leitão Assado

Leitão Assado: Demonstrating his expertise with red meat as well, Chef Herlander prepared the pork to be succulent, with crisped skin. The orange serves as a palate cleanser, providing a refreshing contrast to the smoked sausage and pork offal rice, which carried a vinegary aroma. Be cautious with the sauce, as too much can overshadow the pork.

Brisa do Liz

Brisa do Liz: Originating from Leira, each dense bite of the pudding was imbued with a rich history. We were informed that the dish was first invented at a convent, tracing its origins back an entire century. Upon tasting, I immediately drew a mental comparison to Thai desserts made from duck egg yolks (thong yip, thong yod, foi thong), since they were heavily influenced by Portuguese Trouxas de Caldas and Trouxas de Ovos during Portugal’s first contact with my homeland. The lemongrass sorbet offered a refreshing palate cleanser, presenting a fusion twist that echoed my initial impressions.

The Macau Roosevelt Hotel

What we liked: The bright, spacious setting offered us an excellent view of Cotai, creating a relaxed atmosphere amidst sleek interiors and a lavish feast. The meal presented a flavorful tapestry, highlighting the fundamental flavors of Portuguese food, with Chef Herlander's unique twists providing an even deeper exploration and a taste of the cuisine's evolution.

What we didn’t like: While I enjoyed the individual components of the Leitão Assado, it felt as though the rice and pork were locked in a constant struggle to overpower one another. The addition of a side dish of simple roasted vegetables or a salad might have helped balance this dish.

What you should order: Tiborna de alheira, Caldo Verde, Bacalhau à Brás, Polvo à Lagareiro, Brisa do Liz

Location: D’ouro, 3/F, The Macau Roosevelt Hotel, Avenida dos Jogos da Ásia Oriental, Macau

Contact details: [email protected] / +853 6328 8025

This food review is based on a complimentary media tasting provided by D’ouro Macau in exchange for a truthful review and no compensation. The opinions expressed within represent the views of the author.   

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