Urban Greening to Boost Biodiversity, Fight Climate Change
Asia/ Terra/ Sustainability

Urban Greening: A Catalyst for Biodiversity and Climate Action

Urban Greening to Boost Biodiversity Fight Climate Change Header Photo by Website/British Ecological Society

According to a recent study by the University of Melbourne, diversifying indigenous plant population in urban areas can significantly boost insect biodiversity and mitigate the adverse effects of urbanization.

The study, published in the British Ecological Society journal, ‘Ecological Solutions and Evidence’, centred around a small urban greenspace in Melbourne. Researchers found that increasing the complexity of plant communities in urban areas led to a sevenfold enhancement in insect species diversity over three years. This underscores the significant ecological benefits of urban greening projects like rooftop gardens and urban wildflower meadows.

Dr. Luis Mata, the lead author of the study, explained that their findings provide crucial evidence that supports best practice in greenspace design and encourages policies aimed at mitigating the negative impacts of urbanization on both humans and other species. The study, initiated in 2016, began with a greenspace that consisted only of a grass lawn and two trees.

Over four years and after 14 insect surveys, the researchers identified 94 insect species, with 91 being indigenous to Victoria, Australia. Dr. Mata expressed hope that their study could serve as a catalyst to showcase how urban greening can bring about positive ecological changes.

Despite the reduction to nine plant species by the study’s third year, these remaining species still supported 7.3 times more insect species than the original greenspace. This breakthrough study offers a flexible, adaptable approach to assessing the ecological benefits of urban greening, making it relevant for scientists and urban planners worldwide.

Dr. Mata expressed hope that their study could serve as a catalyst for a new way to demonstrate how urban greening may effect positive ecological changes.

“I’d love to see many more urban greenspacestransformed into habitats for indigenous species,” said Dr. Mata, “we hope that our study will serve as a catalyst for a new way to demonstrate how urban greening may effect positive ecological changes.”

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