We Tried Holy Eats’ The Last Supper Board and It Was Awesome

Introducing Holy Eats’ The Last Supper Board, a Carnivore Wet Dream

Holy Eats on Elgin Street is Soho’s most daring ceremonious dining and wining space, innovating with aperitive daily deals and heavenly happy hour drinks. With a rotating fusion menu of rich meats, seafood, and veggies, Holy Eats is the neighbourhood locale for homely indulging.

Opening doors in the summer of 2018, Holy Eats remains a cult favourite among foodies and drinkers in the Soho patch for an alternative, countercultural spot that provokes with its venue interior, drink combinations, and fiery flavours.

The edgy bar-restaurant helmed by tattoo parlour Galaxy Tattoo owner Dust and restaurateur Eddie Oei who both sought to expose Hong Kong to an alternative space for drinking and fusion Western-Southeast Asian dishes that boast strong name recognition across the city.

Salty Heaven With The Last Supper Board

In a refresh of their tapas fusion menu, Holy Eats is set to introduce The Last Supper Board (HK$888, 4 PAX), a carb-heavy, meat-packed charcuterie board to celebrate boozy brunches and shared feasts during a time where laughing is meant to be celebrated, featuring a curated selection of 10 hardy Holy Eats classics.

First up, we dug into Holy Eats' holy-trinity of salty goodness, the pan-seared rare flank steak, creamy mashed potatoes, and kitchen gravy, with Dijon mustard to join in the mixture.

Be sure to scoop up a bite-size chunk of steak on your fork and dunk it in a healthy serving of mash and gravy to enjoy a perfect combination of beefy umami, salt, and milky cream. With a dash of salt and mustard to heighten flavours, the combo is a great introduction to the rich creamy, meaty flavours on the platter. We recommend adding the roasted garlic to the meat and potato dish for some sweetness.

Next up, we manned ourselves with Holy Eats’ charred sourdough buns and dug deep into the zesty and spicy guacamole dip that shines bright under the soft lighting in the funky venue.

This is what guacamole should taste like. Creamy and fruity with the crushed avocado, slightly salty to balance out the pungent citrus, and a nice kick with the crushed hot peppers to innovate on the recipe. The smokiness and crunch of the charred bread makes for a pleasant olfactory adventure eating this fine dip.

Onto our favourite, and Soho’s top cheese dish, the Mac Daddy & Cheese, a chewy, ooey-gooey, and salty cup of warmth, cooked with a homemade triple-cheese sauce, and topped with breadcrumbs, garlic, thyme, grated parmesan, and parsley.

You cannot fault the mac and cheese at Holy Eats – it is a near perfect human creation. From the crispy, lightly charred and parmesan-dusted top to its creamy insides, every bite is soft, melting in your mouth. The saltiness of the dish balances out any strong creamy cheese flavours that make this dish super addictive.

The seafood offering on the epic charcuterie board comes in the form of Holy Eats’ sautéed shrimp, lightly fried in a XO sauce with garlic, and the Grilled Octopus, topped with a homemade chimichurri sauce and saffron.

Both the shrimp and octopus are purchased and cooked fresh, and this shows when savouring the pair. The shrimp is bouncy when bitten into and pairs well with the XO sauce and garlic that bring out a sour and spicy combination that seasons the shrimp. The chimichurri is slightly acidic and vinegary which helps enrich the octopus that lacks a salty flavouring.

Another highlight on The Last Supper Board are the pork and veal mixed sausages, an herby meaty mix of pork and beef encased in thin wrapping, pan-fried to introduce a candied texture on its outer layer.

The sausages are grainy on the side and, when paired with the gravy and mashed potatoes, you can find a strong earthy taste. The pork sausages are slightly sweeter than the darker meat mixed sausages, which pair well with the sweet garlic.

The platter’s sautéed mushrooms and grilled tomatoes are small additions to the four-person meal but are bursting with umami and earthy flavour. The mushrooms, cooked with garlic and black pepper, are gushing with juices. The tomatoes pop in your mouth and release a pleasant tarty flavour. Their charred skin introduces a bit of sweetness too that is welcomed.

Finally are Holy Eats’ potato fries, simply oil-fried and served with a slight dusting of salt. Whilst not the definitive highlight of The Last Supper Board, the fries are perfect as a tool for dunking gravy, tomato ketchup, mayonnaise, and any other dips on offer. They have a thin crispy coating that, when soaked in sauce, transforms into its mashed potato cousin – very creamy.

Verdict

Holy Eats’ The Last Supper Board is a perfect introduction to the funky, fusion flavours that the Elgin Street diner constantly innovates with. It is juicy, salty, and very creamy and meaty. The meat-green-seafood charcuterie board is a great addition to a weekend drunk brunch meet-up with three close pals.

Our favourites are the Mac Daddy and Cheese, guacamole with sourdough, mash and gravy, and mushrooms. We recommend pairing each item with either a heavy dollop of gravy, mustard, or their homemade tangy mayonnaise. Wash down this hefty meal with Holy Eats’ bloody Slutty Mary (HK$130) or kafir-lime-infused rum drink The Red Sea (HK$125).

This food review is based on a complimentary media tasting provided by Holy Eats in exchange for a truthful review and no compensation. The opinions expressed within represent the views of the author.


The edgy bar-restaurant helmed by tattoo parlour Galaxy Tattoo owner Dust and restaurateur Eddie Oei who both sought to expose Hong Kong to an alternative space for drinking and fusion Western-Southeast Asian dishes that boast strong name recognition across the city.

Salty Heaven With The Last Supper Board

In a refresh of their tapas fusion menu, Holy Eats is set to introduce The Last Supper Board (HK$888, 4 PAX), a carb-heavy, meat-packed charcuterie board to celebrate boozy brunches and shared feasts during a time where laughing is meant to be celebrated, featuring a curated selection of 10 hardy Holy Eats classics.

First up, we dug into Holy Eats' holy-trinity of salty goodness, the pan-seared rare flank steak, creamy mashed potatoes, and kitchen gravy, with Dijon mustard to join in the mixture.

Be sure to scoop up a bite-size chunk of steak on your fork and dunk it in a healthy serving of mash and gravy to enjoy a perfect combination of beefy umami, salt, and milky cream. With a dash of salt and mustard to heighten flavours, the combo is a great introduction to the rich creamy, meaty flavours on the platter. We recommend adding the roasted garlic to the meat and potato dish for some sweetness.

Next up, we manned ourselves with Holy Eats’ charred sourdough buns and dug deep into the zesty and spicy guacamole dip that shines bright under the soft lighting in the funky venue.

This is what guacamole should taste like. Creamy and fruity with the crushed avocado, slightly salty to balance out the pungent citrus, and a nice kick with the crushed hot peppers to innovate on the recipe. The smokiness and crunch of the charred bread makes for a pleasant olfactory adventure eating this fine dip.

Onto our favourite, and Soho’s top cheese dish, the Mac Daddy & Cheese, a chewy, ooey-gooey, and salty cup of warmth, cooked with a homemade triple-cheese sauce, and topped with breadcrumbs, garlic, thyme, grated parmesan, and parsley.

You cannot fault the mac and cheese at Holy Eats – it is a near perfect human creation. From the crispy, lightly charred and parmesan-dusted top to its creamy insides, every bite is soft, melting in your mouth. The saltiness of the dish balances out any strong creamy cheese flavours that make this dish super addictive.

The seafood offering on the epic charcuterie board comes in the form of Holy Eats’ sautéed shrimp, lightly fried in a XO sauce with garlic, and the Grilled Octopus, topped with a homemade chimichurri sauce and saffron.

Both the shrimp and octopus are purchased and cooked fresh, and this shows when savouring the pair. The shrimp is bouncy when bitten into and pairs well with the XO sauce and garlic that bring out a sour and spicy combination that seasons the shrimp. The chimichurri is slightly acidic and vinegary which helps enrich the octopus that lacks a salty flavouring.

Another highlight on The Last Supper Board are the pork and veal mixed sausages, an herby meaty mix of pork and beef encased in thin wrapping, pan-fried to introduce a candied texture on its outer layer.

The sausages are grainy on the side and, when paired with the gravy and mashed potatoes, you can find a strong earthy taste. The pork sausages are slightly sweeter than the darker meat mixed sausages, which pair well with the sweet garlic.

The platter’s sautéed mushrooms and grilled tomatoes are small additions to the four-person meal but are bursting with umami and earthy flavour. The mushrooms, cooked with garlic and black pepper, are gushing with juices. The tomatoes pop in your mouth and release a pleasant tarty flavour. Their charred skin introduces a bit of sweetness too that is welcomed.

Finally are Holy Eats’ potato fries, simply oil-fried and served with a slight dusting of salt. Whilst not the definitive highlight of The Last Supper Board, the fries are perfect as a tool for dunking gravy, tomato ketchup, mayonnaise, and any other dips on offer. They have a thin crispy coating that, when soaked in sauce, transforms into its mashed potato cousin – very creamy.

Verdict

Holy Eats’ The Last Supper Board is a perfect introduction to the funky, fusion flavours that the Elgin Street diner constantly innovates with. It is juicy, salty, and very creamy and meaty. The meat-green-seafood charcuterie board is a great addition to a weekend drunk brunch meet-up with three close pals.

Our favourites are the Mac Daddy and Cheese, guacamole with sourdough, mash and gravy, and mushrooms. We recommend pairing each item with either a heavy dollop of gravy, mustard, or their homemade tangy mayonnaise. Wash down this hefty meal with Holy Eats’ bloody Slutty Mary (HK$130) or kafir-lime-infused rum drink The Red Sea (HK$125).

This food review is based on a complimentary media tasting provided by Holy Eats in exchange for a truthful review and no compensation. The opinions expressed within represent the views of the author.

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